Book Club: An American Sickness

The U.S. healthcare system is a hot mess. Even people who know things are convoluted and expensive might not realize the extent: we pay far more for just about all aspects of healthcare here than anywhere else, and our outcomes are worse pretty much across the board (see this article from the Commonwealth Fund for details).  As tempting as it is to implicitly trust that you’ll get the best care in the world right here, the facts would suggest otherwise. Every other major developed economny in the world as some form of universal access. So why do Americans cling to the idea that our healthcare market is somehow sacred, and that a market-based approach is the answer? I’ve talked about why healthcare is not just another commodity before, but it’s still true.

Elisabeth Rosenthal, a physician turned journalist who has worked for the NYT and Kaiser Health News, wrote a book last year. In it, she exposes a lot of the causes and effects of the major malfunctions in our healthcare system. Much of this is illuminating— examples about hospital conglomerates and pharmaceutical pricing are spot-on. But what seems to lack punch is the explanation for why this upside-down, losing system persists. When healthcare is treated like every other business, greed drives, incentives are bonkers, and lobbyists shape policy. When healthcare is considered as a public service, things are different. But once powerful people are making obscene amounts of money, it’s nigh impossible to unring that bell. Are there market failures? Big time. Can the people affected muster enough influence to combat the big-money lobbying of professions and industry that have become accustomed to fat-cat money? Fat chance.

Aother quibble: Rosenthal is mercelessly physician-centric. She doesn’t consider the unique added value of team-based healthcare or other professional expertise, choosing instead to lump unique professions like NPs and PAs together as “extenders”. Barf. Dr. Rosenthal, I wish you’d take a broader view of health.

That said, give it a read. It’s interesting/depressing. And you might pick up some useful tips for your nex hospital visit, knock on wood.